NSW Measles Case Now Recovering, Had Visited Pacific Square Maroubra and 3 Other Venues Whilst Infectious

NSW Measles Case Now Recovering, Had Visited Pacific Square Maroubra and 3 Other Venues Whilst Infectious

NSW’s first confirmed measles case since February 2020 has now been found to no longer be contagious. The person has been infectious for a week and visited several venues during that time including Pacific Square in Maroubra.



NSW Health said that the person who contracted the disease is in their 50s and was infected whilst travelling in Asia, but developed the symptoms after returning to Sydney.

The person who had been infectious for a week before developing symptoms had visited St Andrew’s Catholic Church Malabar for mass (4 September 2022, 10.30 am), Tyree Energy Building, University of NSW (6 September, all day), University of NSW’s Lounge Restaurant (6 September, 12.15 pm to 2 pm) and Pacific Square Maroubra (7 September, 9 am to 11 am).

The person, however, has now been reported to be no longer infectious and is already recovering at home after being reported to be isolated in hospital last 13 September 2022.

There were no secondary infections detected following the incident. But whilst NSW Health said that the locations where the infected person had visited do not pose an ongoing risk, people who may be susceptible to measles and were also present at the said locations are urged to be on alert for possible symptoms until 24 September 2022.

Those who are considered to be susceptible to measles are the people who never had two-lifetime doses of the measles vaccine, have a confirmed history of measles infections, or have a weakened immune system.



“If you develop symptoms, please call ahead to your GP to ensure you do not wait in the waiting room with other patients,” Dr McAnulty said.

Dr McAnulty also highlighted the importance of measles immunisation as “maintaining high rates” of  immunisation within the community “reduces the risk of measles being imported into Australia by returned travellers.” She furthered that through herd immunity, the spread of the virus locally, once it is introduced, is reduced.